Thursday, January 25, 2018

Yarn on the Moon: A Tribute to the Upcoming Lunar Trifecta




Earth’s natural satellite is about to do an extremely cool – and extremely rare - thing on January 31. Not only will we get to see a lunar eclipse (total if you’re on the West Coast), but it will be the first blue moon lunar eclipse to occur since 1866 – that’s 150 years in the making!

A blue moon is a second full moon in one calendar month, and is such a rare event that it even coined the expression "once in a blue moon." If that in combination with a lunar eclipse isn’t enough to get you out of bed at 4 AM, it will be a Supermoon too, meaning it will be so close in its orbit around Earth that it will be 30% brighter and 14% bigger!

In anticipation of this rare lunar spectacle, we're paying tribute with some moon-inspired yarnspiration! Turns out we fiber enthusiasts love the moon so much we've named a LOT of colorways after it.


The Moonstones:

When it comes to silvery grey hues, “Moonstone” is by far the most popular color on our shelves. Known for its adularescence (that bluish, milky glow emanating from below its surface), moonstone gives the impression of moonlight on water - hence its name!

And while it’s not technically found on the moon, this lovely gemstone has been revered for ages and even inspired the Greeks and Romans to associate it with their lunar deities. Today, it's inspiring fiber enthusiasts to name their yarn after it!



Moving clockwise from "1":




More Moon-Inspired Colorways!



Moonstruck, as in “mentally deranged, supposedly by the influence of the moon;
crazed dreamily romantic or bemused.” See Cher in Moonstruck.





Apparently, moon rocks aren't just found on the moon. After typing "moon rock" into google, I learned they're also found on the earth in the form of a highly popular cannabis product. Who knew?





In astronomy, Dark of the Moon is also known as New Moon.
During this phase, the moon is not visible in the sky.

Penumbra is the term for the shadow cast by the earth or moon 
over an area experiencing a partial eclipse. In February 2017, the moon got a 
little darker when the earth cast a shadow, or penumbra, on its surface.





Did you know moondust tastes and smells like gunpowder? You can read











In Roman mythology, the goddess of the moon was Luna (also known as Diana),
 and in Latin, "luna" means "moon".




In Greek mythology, Selene, Artemis and Hecate were all lunar goddesses, 
but only Selene was regarded as the personification of the moon itself.



And we can't forget a few of our 
favorite moon-inspired knits!















Happy moon gazing!

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